Failure to diagnose or misdiagnosis of a lethal condition

| Oct 12, 2020 | Medical Malpractice

Regardless of your health, you expect to receive top-of-the-line care from your medical team. Unfortunately, this doesn’t always happen. When a doctor fails to diagnose a lethal condition, it can result in death or a shortened life expectancy.

While there is no shortage of lethal conditions, some of the most concerning include heart conditions, cancer, infection, stroke and amniotic fluid embolism in pregnant women.

Steps to take after a failure to diagnose or misdiagnosis

Here are some steps to consider taking if a medical professional failed to diagnose or misdiagnosed a lethal condition:

  • Consider your legal rights: While your health is top priority, you shouldn’t lose sight of the fact that a medical professional made a serious mistake putting your health and future well-being at risk. You could have grounds for a medical malpractice claim.
  • Collect evidence: This goes along with learning more about your legal rights. Should you come to the conclusion that you want to take action, having evidence to back up your claim is critical. An attorney can help you collect the evidence you need, but it’s also important to do your part in the process.
  • Find a new doctor: It goes without saying you don’t want to continue to receive care from the same doctor and medical team as a whole. Immediately begin your search for a doctor who can assess you current situation and provide a treatment plan moving forward.

These are the types of steps you can take if a doctor failed to diagnose a lethal condition.

If a loved one has passed on as a result of medical malpractice, you may be left to pick up the pieces. As you grieve, don’t hesitate to consider your legal rights and collect evidence related to your loved one’s mistreatment.

When your health takes a turn for the worse, you put your trust in your medical team. If they neglect to diagnose a serious condition, it’s time to take action with the idea of protecting your future.

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