New York’s construction death registry aims to protect workers

| Mar 17, 2021 | Construction Accidents

Construction is one of the most dangerous professions a person can pursue. Despite New York having stricter rules than many other states, dozens of construction workers die in any given year in our state.

Increased safety requirements and training obligations for construction companies have done little to protect the workers who help build and repair buildings across the state. Now, in its most recent efforts to protect construction workers, New York has enacted a new law that will expand mandated reporting to a state registry for deaths that occur on the job in construction.

What did New York Senate Bill S1302 change?

Signing into law on February 16, Senate Bill S1302 addresses discrepancies in different counties about construction death reporting. It also changed the language in the registry reporting requirements so that companies couldn’t avoid their obligations because the death didn’t involve a direct-hire employee.

The language in the new law mandates that companies report fatality involving direct employees, contracted employees, subcontracted employees, independent contractors, temporary workers, contingency workers, apprentices, interns, volunteers and anyone else with a business-related purpose on a job site.

How will this new law help workers?

A registry can be a valuable tool to help the state set better rules in the future. With a centralized registry tracking worker fatalities, it is easier for the state to identify patterns in the companies, projects and employees involved in such tragedies.

Additionally, businesses can no longer use questionable employment practices to avoid reporting obligations after an accident on a job site, and new laws may take shape as the data collected informs lawmakers about the real-world risks of construction professionals.

If you or a loved one has been injured on the job, it’s essential that you get the compensation you need to cover medical bills, lost wages and other financial losses as well as damages. An experienced attorney can help.

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